Worries

What were you worried about this time last year?

I read that question on a client’s calendar about three years ago and it has stuck with me. I must have been going through one of my “stressed out” phases because I remember laughing when I read the question. I couldn’t remember anything that was bothering me the same time last year. I laughed because it became crystal clear to me at the moment that I read the question that I really had nothing to be so upset about. I was stressed out just for the sake of being stressed out. Of course there were “things” that made me “stressed”. And, if I was really “stressed”, I would find more to “stress” over. It all seems quite funny until you think about one of the number one things that contributes to disease is…..yep……stress!

The first week of July will always be a time where I can answer the question, “What were you worried about this time last year?” This time last year, I had just had a spinal tap and then a spinal patch and was waiting for the results. I was worried that I might have MS. Worrying about possibly having a disease is way different that actually having it and worrying about how to handle it. At least when you know, you can stop worrying and take action! I couldn’t believe when the MRI of my spine came back clean that my first neurologist suggested that I didn’t have MS and didn’t feel the need for a spinal tap. She wanted to take the “wait and see” approach. I am so not good with “wait and see”.

I cried the month prior to my diagnosis way more than I have cried since I was diagnosed a year ago. Over the course of my first year of being aware of my MS, I think I am calmer and less scared. I know more and I worry less. I am taking care of myself and my MS. I am listening to any and all advice and remembering the words that are helpful and simply dismissing the ones that are not.

Eat a low fat diet: Helpful
Look at house plans with no stairs: Not Helpful
Get plenty of sleep: Helpful
Plan for exacerbations: Not helpful
Practice Yoga: Helpful

I plan to continue to treat my MS, be open to many more words of wisdom, to eat better, exercise more, rest often and worry even less. I will be ok.

What were you worried about this time last year?

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5 responses to “Worries

  1. I WAS WORRIED ABOUT YOU THIS TIME LAST YEAR!!! I LOVE YOU AND WILL ALWAYS WORRY ABOUT YOU BECAUSE YOU ARE MY SISTER OF JOY!

    A

  2. Dad and I were so worried about you and were trying so hard not to let you know how worried we were. You are our precious daughter and would rather have anything happen to us instead of you. We are still worried, but learning to handle it better because of your example. We love you.
    m and d

  3. Worry is a fruitless exercise. What does it really accomplish? Nothing. Just adds to the stress of life. Last year at this time I was contemplating LDN-having found it on line. I was seeing the need to go off Avonex because of the cost. I was wondering if this was going to be a wise choice for me. Would I remain stable? Would my neurologist prescribe it? I prayed a lot over all of this and for me, that brings great peace of mind.

  4. Just wanted to pop in and say hello and let you know that I was worried about the same thing this time last year. I was admitted to the hospital for my first course of steroids at the end of June, and was actually asked “how long have you had MS?” by a resident before my doctor had had “the talk” with me.

    Best of luck, and I’m enjoying your blog!

    Hala

  5. Charles-A. Rovira

    I was worried about the same thing I’m worried about now, something I can do nothing about: impending unemployment.

    I’ve had MS since 1969 or so, and its been a pretty good run of jobs despite it all, but I fear its drawing to a close.

    So I’m trying to make MSBPodcast.com a going concern to help us all (and myself as well.)

    After all, somebody has got to go wading through all that indie music picking themes, writing episodes and selecting the gems amid the dross.

    And it might as well be me. 🙂

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